I Tried “Sexy Water,” TikTok’s Latest Hydration Trend

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If there’s one thing TikTok loves, it’s liquids. Between the sleepy girl mocktail, the snow chococinno, and the colostrum smoothie, there’s no shortage of fancy drinks. Today’s latest craze and viral beverage? “Sexy water.”

The name is alluring, even seductive — but sexy water isn’t anything too groundbreaking. You may even already be drinking it.

The term “sexy water” was coined by TikTok content creator Kelly Stranick (@kellygracemae), and it refers to, basically, a big glass of water with lots of functional mix-ins.

In October 2023, Stranick posted a TikTok about her sexy water routine, which involved her adding a variety of fruits, veggies, and supplements to her morning water to make hydrating a little “less mundane,” in her words. She noted that her sexy water recipes are always a little different — and she occasionally posts whatever version she’s currently drinking — but her original recipe included filtered water, lemon, cucumber, spearmint, a scoop of colostrum, chlorophyll, lion’s mane, and cordyceps and mushroom multivitamins.

But is it safe to mix so many supplements? And do these add-ins actually have any health benefits? We asked a registered dietitian for the lowdown on what you need to know about sexy water.

What Is Sexy Water, Exactly?

Simply put, sexy water is a big glass of water with functional ingredients and supplements mixed in, preferably sipped from a cute glass and a reusable straw. The actual ingredients can vary, but the goal is to “sex up” your morning, romanticize hydration, and maximize your water intake.

What Are the Potential Benefits of Sexy Water?

Adding different flavors and mix-ins to your water can certainly have a positive impact, says Rebecca Russell, RD, the founder of The Social Nutritionist. She agrees with Stranick’s point that sexy water may “make drinking water a bit more interesting,” therefore helping people actually hydrate.

Mixing in the right ingredients can be beneficial — with a few caveats, Russell says. If you add certain minerals to your water, for instance, it may help your body absorb more of the H20, hydrating more efficiently. Stirring in a supplement with a study-proven perk — like fiber, for improved digestion, or one of the expert-approved green powders in this list — could also help sneak some additional health benefits into your morning glass.

But when it comes to mix-ins, you can get too much of a good thing. Which brings us to . . .

What Are the Risks of Sexy Water?

Stranick’s original sexy water recipe contained several different supplements, which raises some red flags. For one, the supplement industry isn’t strictly regulated by the FDA, so it can be difficult to find quality products with proven health benefits.

And even if all the ingredients you’re tossing into your sexy water are safe on their own, they could interact with each other or other meds in your routine. “Certain supplements and herbals can interact with medications or other supplements, so you want to be careful with what’s being mixed,” Russell confirms.

“Specifically with minerals, they [can] compete for absorption, so adding a whole bunch of different minerals might not be the best idea,” she adds. Stranick herself notes that chlorophyll, which she adds to her sexy water, can hinder the absorption of certain meds, so you want to make sure to take them at separate times.

Additionally, taking too many supplements or adding too many tinctures to your sexy water can make it hard to identify the culprit if you have a negative reaction, Russell says. For example, chlorophyll and colostrum can both cause digestive upset. If you’ve added in both at once, you may not know what’s to blame, especially if they’re both new to your routine.

In general, you shouldn’t add supplements to your routine just because someone on social media does, Russell says. It’s also always a good idea to clear any supplements you’re interested in taking with your doctor, especially if you’re taking any prescription meds.

Should You Try Sexy Water?

In the name of science, I put sexy water to the test. I added half a packet of Ultima Replenisher Watermelon Electrolyte Mix ($21), a splash of lemon juice, one sliced strawberry, and two mint leaves to a glass of filtered water and chugged it before I ate breakfast. Did I feel like I was at a spa? Yes. Did it encourage me to drink water immediately after I woke up? For sure. Did I feel like an entirely different person? Not quite.

When asked what her ideal sexy water would include, Russell suggests keeping it simple. Her recipe? A few ConcenTrace Trace Mineral Drops ($37), especially if you’re drinking highly filtered water, and sugar-free electrolytes for added magnesium, potassium, and sodium to boost hydration.

All in all, if sexing up your water encourages you to drink more, go for it! If you want to create your own sexy water, though, take a “less is more” approach. Add in some fruit or herbs for flavoring, plus an electrolyte packet or a scoop of fiber powder or another supplement you know works for you, and resist the urge to toss in the proverbial kitchen sink.

Keep it simple, be mindful of what you’re adding, and don’t expect any health miracles, Russell says. If you prefer good ol’ plain water, that’s great too. The most important thing is to drink at least six to eight glasses a day.


Andi Breitowich is a Chicago-based freelance writer and graduate from Emory University and Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. Her work has appeared in POPSUGAR, Women’s Health, Cosmopolitan, and elsewhere.


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